Captain Hume's Journey to India

Reviewed on Mon 29 Feb, 2016

The result of Philippe Pierlot’s musing is this musical “Journey” to India, in which after nine solo selections from Tobias Hume’s first book, he is joined by Dhruba Ghosh on sarangi (a bowed, short-necked Indian instrument) for a whimsical exploration of what Hume might have written for this novel combination.

What if, wonders Philippe Pierlot, the eccentric viola da gamba player and composer Tobias Hume (c.1569-1645) had travelled to India? Indeed Hume, who was at times a mercenary in the Swedish and Russian armies, was the kind of adventurous figure who might very well have done just that. The result of Pierlot’s musing is this musical “Journey” to India, in which after nine solo selections from Hume’s first book, he is joined by Dhruba Ghosh on sarangi (a bowed, short-necked Indian instrument) for a whimsical exploration of what Hume might have written for this novel combination. After Ghosh introduces his instrument in 'Sunrise by the Riverside', backed by tabla and tanpura, Ghosh and Pierlot duet on Hume’s own “Death”. By the final tour-de-force 'Lamento di Tristano', in which the two bowed instruments weave exotically exuberant textures, the listener is left wishing Hume really had gone to India after all.
–Mark Walker